top of page

ABOUT

about us

Set among the Vindhya Hills in the state of Madhya Pradesh in central India, Bandhavgarh National Park is 1,536 square kilometres of biologically diverse Royal Bengal Tiger habitat. The rich landscape intersected by numerous rivers and streams helps support a variety of sustainable eco-systems.

 

This diversity has resulted in Bandhavgarh having the highest density of elusive tigers in the world. The vegetation consists of Sal trees and mixed forest with large stretches of bamboo, grassland, hills, springs and marshy meadows with eight feet tall elephant grass.

 

Bandhavgarh comprises 32 densely vegetated hills, which absorb water like cotton during the monsoon season. The water percolates as spring water to the many perennial rivers and streams, big and small.

 

This environment supports a variety of wildlife:

  • More than 37 species of mammals including the Spotted, Sambar, and Barking Deer, Nilgai or Blue Bull (the biggest antelope), Gaur (Indian Bison - the largest cattle in the world), Wild Boar, Wild Dog, Indian Civet, Palm Squirrel, Jackal, Sloth Bears, Leopards, and of course, Royal Bengal Tigers.

  • Common Langurs and Rhesus Macaque monkeys represent the primate group.

  • Reptilians include Cobra, Krait, Viper, Python, Turtle and a variety of lizards including the Varanus.

  • More than 250 species of birds, including Blue-bearded Bee-eaters and White-browed Fantails, and the Malabar Hornbill.

 

Emerald Eco Retreat is located near the Gohri Gate within the buffer zone of the Bandhavgarh National Park. The lodge is surrounded by the Sal forests and nearby is the small, rural village of Parasi.

 

The main building of the lodge overlooks a large waterhole, which attracts a diverse selection of wildlife. Your wildlife experience begins from within the lodge itself! From sitting around the campfire listening to the alarm calls of monkeys and deer as they alert you to the presence of a tiger to exploring the myriad of stars above you, your stay at Emerald Tiger Retreat will surely be a memorable one.

LOCATED IN MADHYA PRADESH

Emerald Tiger Retreat is located in the Bandhavgarh National Park, in the State of Madhya Pradesh, central India. Madhya Pradesh retains landmarks from eras throughout Indian history. Begun in the 10th century, its Hindu and Jain temples at Khajuraho are renowned for their carvings of erotic scenes, most prominently Kandariya Mahadeva, a temple with more than 800 sculptures. 

 

Population: 73.34 million (2012)

Official languageHindi

Capitals: Bhopal, Jabalpur (Judiciary)

 

Seasons

The Bandhavgarh National Park experiences the North Indian Monsoon and has a well-defined winter and summer season. The National Park is open for visitors and safaris from 15th October to 30th June. The Retreat is open all year round for visitors.
 

Summer - April to June (30-45C) - Park Closes June 30th

Monsoon - July to September (25-35C) - Park Closed but retreat open to non-safari visitors.
Winter - October to March (12-20C) - Park Opens October 15th

 

BANDHAVGARH TIGER RESERVE

Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve offers protection for the flora and fauna within its boundaries. The diverse ecosystem has resulted in Bandhavgarh having the highest density of elusive Bengal tigers in the world. There are now more than 65 tigers in the park

 

The reserve is open to tourists who pay to see the animals in their natural environment which generates jobs and income for the region. The reserve also provides education for local people about living with tigers.

 

Set among the Vindhya Hills in the state of Madhya Pradesh in central India, Bandhavgarh National Park consists of 1,161 square kilometers of biologically diverse tiger habitat. The rich landscape is dotted with numerous rivers and streams.The vegetation consists of Sal trees and mixed forest with large stretches of bamboo, grassland, hills, springs and marshy meadows with eight feet tall elephant grass. 

 

The more than 37 species of mammals include the Spotted, Sambar, and Barking Deer, Nilgaior the Blue Bull (the biggest antelope), Gaur (Indian Bison-the largest cattle in the world), Wild Boar, Wild Dog, Indian Civet, Palm Squirrel, Jackal, Sloth Bears, Leopards, as well as Tigers. Common Langurs and Rhesus Macaque monkeys represent the primate group. 

 

Reptiles include Cobra, Krait, Viper, Python, Turtle and a variety of lizards including the Varanus.There are more than 250 species of birds, including Blue-bearded Bee-eaters and White-browed Fantails, and the Malabar Hornbill.

TIGER FACTS

  • India is home to 70% of the world’s tigers

  • Bengal tigers are listed as endangered

  • It is thought that Bengal tigers arrived in India approximately 12,000 years ago

  • It is the national animal of both India and Bangladesh

  • Through concerted efforts to increase habitat and protect tigers, India’s tiger population has grown from 1,411 in 2006 to around 5,000 in 2019

  • A male tiger’s territory can be between 50-200 square kms

  • From its nose to the end of its tail, a male tiger can be up to 3m long and weigh up to 306kg

  • Their average life span is 10-12 years

  • A group of tigers is called an AMBUSH!

FLORA OF BANDHAVGARH

The flora can be classified as Indus Ganges Monsoon Forest type and is supported by an average rainfall of 1173mm per year. 514 plant species from 110 plant families have been recorded and listed.

 

Sal trees (the scientific name is Shorea robusta) make up over half the forest of Bandhavgarh covering the low lying plains. These semi-evergreen trees grow tall and straight and the timber and the resin from these trees is a useful resource. The resin is used to make incense.

 

Legal and illegal logging has wiped out much of the Sal forests in India but in Bandhavgarh, the Sal forests are now protected.

 

On the upper slopes of Bandhavgarh mixed forests are found, and in the north, large stretches of grasslands and bamboo grow. Other trees seen in the area include Saj, Dhaora, tendu, Arjun and mango trees. 

 

There are a few rare species of plants to be found in the area: the medicinal plant called Buch (its scientific name is Acorus calamus) and the insectivorous plant Drocera peltat.

BIRDS OF BANDHAVGARH

There are 250 bird species belonging to 53 families, out of which 136 are resident, 26 are local migrants, and 86 are migrant. Bamera, Garhpuri, Majhauli and Khitauli reservoire in and around this reserve are the ideal areas for migratory birds during winter.


In the tourism zone of the tiger reserve, Jamuniya, Chakradhara, Sheshsaiya, Bhitari, Bathan, Rajbaheraand Sehra are some of the important places for bird watchers. Asaruleofthumb the good birding places are forest edges particularly around the moist localities.


Bird watching in Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve is an added pleasure for nature lovers and the reduced pace while driving allows for a fuller appreciation of the green Sal forest amidst this beautiful landscape.


Some of  the important birds of the reserve are Lesser adjutant stork, Malabar pied hornbill, Sarus crane, Emerald dove, Pitta, Paradise flycatcher, White throated ground thrush, Crested serpent eagle, Crested hawk eagle and Shaheen falcon.


In addition to this do not forget to check top rocky cliffs for vultures evident with the white color of their droppings.

MAMMALS OF BANDHAVGARH

About 36 species of mammals have been identified and recorded in Bandhavgarh.

In the grasslands herbivores such as chinkara (Indian gazelle) and nilgai (blue bull) are seen and in the denser parts of the forest live the sambar (Indian stag) and the muntjac (barking deer).

Up in the trees two species of primates can be found: the rhesus macaque and the hanuman langur. Smaller animals like the civet, porcupine, ratel and palm squirrel are also inhabitants of Bandhavgarh.

Reptiles such as vipers, ratsnakes, cobras, pythons, turtles and many different types of lizards live in the area as well as predators like the tiger, the leopard, the hyena and the jackal.

EXPERT RESIDENT NATURALIST

Vivek Mohan Sharma has an MSc in Biology. He is a Conservation Biologist, wildlife photographer, writer, naturalist and astronomer. He has carried out extensive research on Herbal, Aromatic and Medicinal Plants in the central highlands of India.

Since 1996, Vivek has been working with sustainable development technologies to minimise the pressure on our natural resources. During this time he has been guiding nature expeditions for film crews, professionals and tourist groups throughout India as an expert naturalist and field Biologist.

Vivek, has delivered lectures, prepared and taught curriculum material for schools in India and Australia about non-conventional sources of energy and sustainable development of natural resources. He has also prepared resource material for teachers on endangered species and threatened habitat.

Since 2005, Vivek has been instrumental in setting up Environmental Education Centres in the prime tiger reserves of Bandhavgarh & Kanha to educate the local villagers, schools and tourists. In 2007, his book, Ambush in Bandhavgarh - Endangered Species & Threatened Habitat was published in NSW, Australia.

bottom of page